Upslope Shawl

Upslope - 1 (8)

For a limited time, you can purchase Upslope for only $2.50. Use the coupon code UPSLOPE at Ravelry checkout to receive the introductory price. This coupon is valid until midnight MDT on December 18, 2017.

Click here to buy now

Upslope is a native Colorado shawl design! Both the yarn (Hue Loco) and the name are from Colorado. Upslope is the name of a locally brewed beer that also went very well with the shape and lines on this design.

Upslope is a slightly asymmetrical shawl that is cast on with just one stitch. It is worked flat, back and forth, mostly in garter stitch, making it a good shawl pattern for beginner knitters.

The color elements are worked in using a very simple form of short row. If you’ve never heard of short rows, you should give this shawl a try, to give yourself a taste. If you are afraid of short rows, you won’t even know you are working them. The short rows in this shawl are worked using simple knitting increases (kfb) and decreases (k2tog) – ANYONE can do them!

These instructions are easy to follow and only include basic knitting skills. There is also no need to worry about weaving in multiple ends, both colors of yarn are carried, almost invisibly along the edge of the shawl, so that you will only end up with a few ends to weave in!

Advent Calendar … for knitters

2017-Advent

In celebration of the Advent and Season of Giving, everyday until the 25th of December, I will be giving away one free pattern. Look for the numbered images on Instagram. One pattern winner will be drawn at random by 5:00 pm MDT each day. Thank you for your support and have a wonderful Christmas season! To enter:

1. Like this picture
2. Become a follower
3. Tag 3 Friends
The giveaway runs for 24 hours, winner will be drawn at random for the prize shown at 5:00 pm MDT. Have fun!!

Simplicity in Lace

Simplicity - 1 (8)

Simplicity in Lace is an easy yet, elegant top-down raglan pullover that only requires basic knitting skills. If you are a beginner knitter, you shouldn’t shy away from attempting this project. Only two basic lace knitting stitches are required: purl two together (p2tog) and yarn over (yo).

This pullover is cast on at the neck edge and worked in rounds down to the bust. At this point, the sleeves are separated from the body, and worked separately. The knitting continues through the body with optional waist shaping down to the hem. Finally, the sleeves are knitted in rounds from the top down.

Gauge: 20 stitches x 32 rows = 4” (10 cm) in stockinette stitch on size US 5 (3.75 mm) needles; measured on a washed and blocked flat swatch. You are advised to ensure that both your stitch and row gauges are accurate.

Difficulty: Easy (raglan seam increases; knitting in the round; picking up stitches from a finished edge).

Needles: Size US 5 (3.75 mm) for body (or size needed to
get gauge), Size US 3 (3.25 mm) for ribbing

Yarn: Yardage depends on the yarn you decide to use. Estimated Requirements using Tosh Sport from madelinetosh yarns; 270 yards / 247 meters per 100 gram skein:  5 (5, 6, 6, 7, 7, 8, 8) skeins or approximately 1240 (1360, 1500, 1600, 1750, 1850, 1990, 2130) yards / 1140 (1240, 1370, 1460, 1690, 1820, 1950) meters

Languages:  Simplicity in Lace is available in both English and German.

Introductory Promotion Code
Valid until midnight MDT on December 7th. Purchase Simplicity in Lace for only $2.99 with the coupon code SIMPLE.

Persistence is Key – RE-Released!

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I am really excited to announce the re-release of Persistence is Key! I worked through the pattern in both German and English and have revised things that may have been a bit unclear.

In honor of my loyal supporters and knitters I am offering a coupon code for 50% off any one of my patterns. To take advantage of this offer, use the coupon code RERE at ravelry check out. This code is valid until December 7th, 2017.

My revelry store:  Amanda Woeger Designs

Thank you for your support, I couldn’t do this without all of you!

Amanda

Lady at the Airport Knit Along

KAL

There is still time to join in the “Lady at the Airport” Knit-Along fun!

We will start on November 6, 2017. There will be no deadline for finishing, the thread will remain open for questions and comments after everyone has has completed their projects.

Prizes will be awarded to the first 3 completed projects.
1st Prize: 3 skeins of Malabrigo Finito
2nd Prize: 1 skein of Merino DK from Rohrspatz & Wollmeise
3rd Prize: 2 free patterns from Amanda Woeger Designs

Please sign up by visiting the KAL thread on revelry here. There you can get your name in the hat by replying to the thread. Also, please create a project page on Ravelry. If you would like to use the above photo, by all means! Just right click to download and then add to your project photos on Ravelry.

For those of you who still need to get a copy of the pattern, I have a Fall Sale promotion going on right now.  This sale is for 50% off all of my patterns using the code FALL at Ravelry checkout (valid until October 30, 2017, midnight MDT).  Just visit my Ravelry Store and see what the exciting possibilities are!

Happy Knitting!
-Amanda

 

 

Pattern Release – Lady at the Airport

Lady - 1

Lady at the Airport is due to go live tomorrow!!! The pattern is worked with @koigu1 Koigu Pemium Merino in fingering weight. Look for the pattern in my Ravelry Store here: https://www.ravelry.com/stores/amanda-woeger-designs

I am offering a discount on the pattern for a limited time. You will be able to buy “Lady at the Airport” on Ravelry for just $2.50 with the coupon code Lady. This code will be valid until midnight MDT, Sunday the 22nd of October. 

—–

Lady at the Airport was inspired by the requests of two lovely neighbors! One of them had seen an elegant poncho worn by a lady passing her in the terminal at the airport. Thanks to you both for your support and encouragement with getting this design on the books!

This poncho is an innovative piece that is worked in two colors. It is knitted from the bottom up from the hem in one piece. The stitches for the cowl neck or optional crew neck are picked up around the neck edge after the body has been completed.

The “sleeves” fall just below the elbows, which helps to show off a lady’s figure, giving this poncho a very flattering look.

These instructions are easy to follow and require intermediate knitting skills such as short rows, grafting, and decreasing on both sides of the fabric.

Sizes
Small (Medium, Large)

Gauge
22 stitches x 32 rows = 4” (10 cm) in stockinette stitch on size US 6 (4.0 mm) needles; measured on a washed and blocked fat swatch. You are advised to ensure that both your stitch and row gauges are accurate.

Difficulty
Intermediate (knit and purl stitches, ssk, k2tog, p2tog and ssp-tbl decreases, m1R and m1L increases, bind off, grafting)

Needles
US Size 6 (4.0 mm) circular needles.

Yarn
Yardage depends on the yarn you decide to use. Estimated Requirements using KPM Premium Merino from Koigu (fngering weight); 175 yards / 160 meters per 50 gram skein:

Small: 4 skeins of the Main Color (MC) and 3 skeins of the Contrast Color (CC)
Medium: 4 skeins of the Main Color (MC) and 3 skeins of the Contrast Color (CC)
Large: 5 skeins of the Main Color (MC) and 4 skeins of the Contrast Color (CC)

Pattern Release – Pink

Pink - 1 (10)

Thank you to everyone who helped support me with this project. Especially my loyal testers! I love you!

I am excited to announce the release of my (current) favorite pullover! PINK

Pink by Amanda Woeger

You may use the following coupon code to get the pattern at a discounted price for the next week.

Code: PINK
Valid until: October 19
Discounted price: $3.99 (regularly $7.00)

Is that a wrap? Shadow wrap short rows

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During my evolution as a knitter, I had always dreaded the short row  or wrap-and-turn. I found myself avoiding patterns that called for any type of short row. I always knew that I would be disappointed in the finished project, because the wrap-and-turn method would just not look neat enough.

Once I began writing my own patterns, I was determined to find a better way to work short rows. They are just so versatile and give the designer a lot of options when it comes to shaping. My research led me from the standard wrap & turn method (either picking up or leaving wraps) to German short rows and Japanese short rows. I do believe I looked up all possible short row methods and was always disappointed with the results.  In the end I found that the “shadow wrap” (AKA “twin stitch”) short row method was the neatest looking, as well as the easiest to knit.

Since discovering the shadow wrap method, it is the only method I have used and the only method I recommend in my patterns. Therefore, I thought it might be high time to make my own photo tutorial to refer back to.

Working a Shadow Wrap Knit Wise vs. Purl Wise
What does this mean exactly? Knit wise or Purl wise? Well, let me tell you! When using the shadow wrap method, it doesn’t matter if you are knitting the right side or the wrong side of the fabric. How the “to-be-wrapped” stitch presents itself determines how that stitch is wrapped.  So, if it is a knit stitch you will be working a shadow wrap knit wise; if it is a purl stitch, you will be working a shadow wrap purl wise.

What is this tutorial teaching me?
This tutorial will describe the individual skills needed to work shadow wrap short rows. These skills are: creating a shadow wrap & turn on a knitted stitch, creating a shadow wrap & turn on a purled stitch, working the shadow wrap of a knitted stitch,  and working the shadow wrap of a purled stitch. How these skills are put into practice varies from design to design. Which means that every knitting pattern will have you working short rows in various ways. Some will have you work a wrap every single stitch while others will call for wraps every 3rd stitch.  There are patterns that have wraps on both ends of the fabric, and others where only knitted wraps are required. Then there are designs with shaping that requires you to work the wraps all at once, while others have you working the wraps one at a time. It all depends on how the designer intends the length-wise shaping to occur.

So let’s get to learning our new skill set!

Creating a shadow wrap on a knitted stitch (shadow wrap knit wise)
Step 1:  Work until you reach the stitch which is to be wrapped. It should be the next stitch on your left needle.

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Step 2:  With your right needle, pick up the right leg of the knitted stitch from the previous row and place it on the left needle.

Shadow - 3   Shadow - 4

Step 3:  Knit into the new loop on the left needle, to create the “shadow stitch”.

Shadow - 5   Shadow - 6

Step 4:  Slip the remaining loop of the original “to-be-wrapped” stitch from the left needle to the right needle, as if to purl. Turn your work.

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Step 5:  Slip the two loops of the wrapped stitch from the left needle to the right, as if to purl.

Shadow - 10

The next stitch on the left needle should be worked as normal, in the manner described in your pattern. In the example swatch, it would be a purl stitch/row.

Creating a shadow wrap on a purled stitch (shadow wrap purl wise)
Step 1:  Work until you reach the stitch which is to be wrapped. It should be the next stitch on your left needle.

Shadow - 11

Step 2:  Slip the “to-be-wrapped” stitch from the left needle to the right, as if to purl.

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Step 3:  Pick up the purl bump of the slipped stitch and place it on the left needle. Do this by inserting your left needle from bottom to top into the bump.

Shadow - 13   Shadow - 14

Step 4:  Now purl this new loop from the left needle and turn your work.

Shadow - 15   Shadow - 16

Step 5:  Slip the two loops of the wrapped stitch from the left needle to the right, as if to purl.

Shadow - 17.jpg

The next stitch on the left needle should be worked as normal, in the manner described in your pattern. In the example swatch, it would be a knit stitch/row.



Now, at some point in your knitting, you are going to have to deal with the shadow wraps you have left behind on your needle. This is where most short row methods are lacking. If you pick up the wrap in the standard wrap & turn method, if you are not practiced, you often end up with uneven stitches and holes in your work. An alternative to picking up the wraps would be to leave them be. However, I find the remaining wraps to be very distracting to the eye. Neither of these solutions seems acceptable to me. The shadow wrap method solves these problems with a very simple solution: there are absolutely no wraps to pick up! Now you will learn how to simply and neatly integrate the shadow wraps into your knitting.

Working the shadow wrap of a knitted stitch
Work in the pattern as described until you reach a shadow wrapped stitch. Keep an eye out for the “double looped” stitch. Now, working the shadow wrapped stitch is as simple as knitting those two loops together!  That’s It!

Shadow - 18   Shadow - 19

Working the shadow wrap of a purled stitch
The same goes for the purled stitch, all you need to do is purl the two loops of the shadow wrapped stitch together.

Shadow - 20   Shadow - 21

 

I hope you will be as happy with your new short row knitting skills as I have been. I would bet some good yarn, that you will never want to return to another short row method!

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